Solitude By Ella Wheeler Wilcox

Ella Wheeler Wilcox

Ella Wheeler Wilcox (November 5, 1850 – October 30, 1919) was an American author and poet. Her best-known work was Poems of Passion.
A popular poet rather than a literary poet, in her poems she expresses sentiments of cheer and optimism in plainly written, rhyming verse.
To Know more about Ella Wheeler Wilcox click here

Laugh, and the world laughs with you;
Weep, and you weep alone;
For the sad old earth must borrow its mirth,
But has trouble enough of its own.
Sing, and the hills will answer;
Sigh, it is lost on the air;
The echoes bound to a joyful sound,
But shrink from voicing care.

Rejoice, and men will seek you;
Grieve, and they turn and go;
They want full measure of all your pleasure,
But they do not need your woe.
Be glad, and your friends are many;
Be sad, and you lose them all,—
There are none to decline your nectared wine,
But alone you must drink life’s gall.

Feast, and your halls are crowded;
Fast, and the world goes by.
Succeed and give, and it helps you live,
But no man can help you die.
There is room in the halls of pleasure
For a large and lordly train,
But one by one we must all file on
Through the narrow aisles of pain.

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What is Philosophy?

Socrates

The word “philosophy” comes from the Ancient Greek φιλοσοφία (philosophia).Phileo meaning “to love” or “to befriend” and , Sophia meaning “wisdom.” Thus, “philosophy” means “the love of wisdom”. The introduction of the terms “philosopher” and “philosophy” has been ascribed to the Greek thinker Pythagoras.

Philosophy provides the foundations upon which all belief structures and fields of knowledge are built. It is the study of general and fundamental problems, such as those connected with reality, existence, knowledge, values, reason, mind, and language. It is distinguished from other ways of addressing such problems by its critical, generally systematic approach and its reliance on rational argument.

Philosophy spans the nature of the universe, the mind, and the body; the relationships between all three, and between people. Philosophy is a field of inquiry – the pursuit of wisdom; the predecessor and complement of science, developing the issues which underly science and think about those questions which are beyond the scope of science.

It is responsible for the definitions of, and the approaches used to develop the theories of, such diverse fields as religion, language, science, law, psychology, mathematics, and politics. It also examines and develops its own structure and procedures, and when it does so is called metaphilosophy: the philosophy of philosophy.
What is philosophy’, is itself a philosophical question.

Philosophy is the acquisition of knowledge.
-Plato

“the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics”
-Webster’s dictionary
Philosophy only is the true one which reproduces most faithfully the statements of nature, and is written down, as it were, from nature’s dictation, so that it is nothing but a copy and a reflection of nature, and adds nothing of its own, but is merely a repetition and echo. – Francis Bacon

Philosophy, being nothing but the study of wisdom and truth.
-George Berkeley

An art, which has an aim to achieve the beauty, is called a philosophy or in the absolute sense it is named wisdom.
-Alpharabius

Philosophy is an interpretation of the world in order to change it.
-Karl Marx

To repeat abstractly, universally, and distinctly in concepts the whole inner nature of the world, and thus to deposit it as a reflected image in permanent concepts always ready for the faculty of reason, this and nothing else is philosophy.
-Arthur Schopenhauer

The object of philosophy is the logical clarification of thoughts. Philosophy is not a theory but an activity. A philosophical work consists essentially of elucidations. The result of philosophy is not a number of ‘philosophical propositions’, but to make propositions clear. Philosophy should make clear and delimit sharply the thoughts which otherwise are, as it were, opaque and blurred.
-Ludwig Wittgenstein

The Branches of Philosophy

• Aesthetics- Aesthetics deals with beauty, art, enjoyment, sensory-emotional values, perception, and matters of taste and sentiment.

• Epistemology- Epistemology is concerned with the nature and scope of knowledge,[11] such as the relationships between truth, belief, and theories of justification.
• Ethics- Ethics, or “moral philosophy,” is concerned primarily with the question of the best way to live, and secondarily, concerning the question of whether this question can be answered.

• Logic- Logic is the study of the principles of correct reasoning. Arguments use either deductive reasoning or inductive reasoning.

• Metaphysics- Metaphysics is the study of the most general features of reality, such as existence, time, the relationship between mind and body, objects and their properties, wholes and their parts, events, processes, and causation. Traditional branches of metaphysics include cosmology, the study of the world in its entirety, and ontology, the study of being.
• Political philosophy- Political philosophy is the study of government and the relationship of individuals (or families and clans) to communities including the state. It includes questions about justice, law, property, and the rights and obligations of the citizen.
• Social philosophy- Social philosophy is the study of questions about social behavior and interpretations of society and social institutions in terms of ethical values rather than empirical relations.

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Socrates Quotes

Socrates

Socrates ( 470 BC – 399 BC) was a classical Greek (Athenian) philosopher credited as one of the founders of Western philosophy. Through his portrayal in Plato’s dialogues, Socrates has become renowned for his contribution to the field of ethics, and it is this Platonic Socrates who lends his name to the concepts of Socratic irony and the Socratic method, or elenchus. The latter remains a commonly used tool in a wide range of discussions, and is a type of pedagogy in which a series of questions is asked not only to draw individual answers, but also to encourage fundamental insight into the issue at hand.

“The mind is everything; what you think you become.”

“I only know that I know nothing.”

“The unexamined life is not worth living.”

“There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance.”

“I cannot teach anybody anything. I can only make them think.”

“Wisdom begins in wonder.”

“Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle.”

“To find yourself, think for yourself.”

“Strong minds discuss ideas, average minds discuss events, weak minds discuss people.”

“By all means marry; if you get a good wife, you’ll become happy; if you get a bad one, you’ll become a philosopher.”

“Be slow to fall into friendship, but when you are in, continue firm and constant.”

“Education is the kindling of a flame, not the filling of a vessel.”

“He who is not contented with what he has, would not be contented with what he would like to have.”

“If you don’t get what you want, you suffer; if you get what you don’t want, you suffer; even when you get exactly what you want, you still suffer because you can’t hold on to it forever. Your mind is your predicament. It wants to be free of change. Free of pain, free of the obligations of life and death. But change is law and no amount of pretending will alter that reality.”

“Our youth now love luxury. They have bad manners, contempt for authority; they show disrespect for their elders and love chatter in place of exercise; they no longer rise when elders enter the room; they contradict their parents, chatter before company; gobble up their food and tyrannize their teachers.”

“Sometimes you put walls up not to keep people out, but to see who cares enough to break them down.”

“Know yourself.”

“The only good is knowledge and the only evil is ignorance.”

“Death may be the greatest of all human blessings.”

“Let him who would move the world first move himself.”

“The secret of happiness, you see, is not found in seeking more, but in developing the capacity to enjoy less.”

“Contentment is natural wealth, luxury is artificial poverty.”

“I examined the poets, and I look on them as people whose talent overawes both themselves and others, people who present themselves as wise men and are taken as such, when they are nothing of the sort.”

.“Every action has its pleasures and its price.”

“Do not do to others what angers you if done to you by others.”

“When the debate is lost, slander becomes the tool of the loser.”

“I am not an Athenian or a Greek, but a citizen of the world.”

“Employ your time in improving yourself by other men’s writings so that you shall come easily by what others have labored hard for.”

“Prefer knowledge to wealth, for the one is transitory, the other perpetual.”

“We cannot live better than in seeking to become better.”

“The secret of change is to focus all of your energy, not on fighting the old, but on building the new.”

“The hour of departure has arrived, and we go our separate ways, I to die, and you to live. Which of these two is better only God knows.”

“Envy is the ulcer of the soul.”

“We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.”

“understanding a question is half an answer”

“The hottest love has the coldest end.”

“Beware the barrenness of a busy life.”

“Thou shouldst eat to live; not live to eat.”

“Be nicer than necessary to everyone you meet. Everyone is fighting some kind of battle.”

“From the deepest desires often come the deadliest hate.”

“The greatest way to live with honour in this world is to be what we pretend to be.”

“Be as you wish to seem.”

“If you want to be a good saddler, saddle the worst horse; for if you can tame one, you can tame all.”

“I know that I am intelligent, because I know that I know nothing.”

“I pray Thee, O God, that I may be beautiful within. ”

“The really important thing is not to live, but to live well. And to live well meant, along with more enjoyable things in life, to live according to your principles.”

“True wisdom comes to each of us when we realize how little we understand about life, ourselves, and the world around us.”

“Once made equal to man, woman becomes his superior.”

“In all of us, even in good men, there is a lawless wild-beast nature, which peers out in sleep.”

“If all our misfortunes were laid in one common heap whence everyone must take an equal portion, most people would be content to take their own and depart.”

“One should never do wrong in return, nor mistreat any man, no matter how one has been mistreated by him.”

“No man has the right to be an amateur in the matter of physical training. It is a shame for a man to grow old without seeing the beauty and strength of which his body is capable.”

“The easiest and noblest way is not to be crushing others, but to be improving yourselves. ”

“The greatest blessing granted to mankind come by way of madness, which is a divine gift.”

“He is richest who is content with the least, for content is the wealth of nature.”

“Children nowadays are tyrants. They contradict their parents, gobble their food, and tyrannise their teachers.”

“Be of good cheer about death, and know this of a truth, that no evil can happen to a good man, either in life or after death.”

“Think not those faithful who praise all thy words and actions; but those who kindly reprove thy faults.”

“Virtue does not come from wealth, but. . . wealth, and every other good thing which men have. . . comes from virtue.”

“The beginning of wisdom is the definition of terms.”

“Not life, but good life, is to be chiefly valued. ”

“He who is unable to live in society, or who has no need because he is sufficient for himself, must be either a beast or a god.”

“To move the world we must move ourselves.”

“The misuse of language induces evil in the soul”

“I know you won’t believe me, but the highest form of Human Excellence is to question oneself and others.”

“When you want wisdom and insight as badly as you want to breathe, it is then you shall have it.”

“It is better to change an opinion than to persist in a wrong one.”

“May the inward and outward man be as one.”

“A system of morality which is based on relative emotional values is a mere illusion, a thoroughly vulgar conception which has nothing sound in it and nothing true.”

“Those who are hardest to love need it the most.”

“Wealth does not bring about excellence, but excellence makes wealth and everything else good for men, both individually and collectively.”

The Death of Socrates

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kahlil gibran on beauty

kahlil gibran

Where shall you seek beauty, and how shall you find her unless she herself be your way and your guide?

And how shall you speak of her except she be the weaver of your speech?

The aggrieved and the injured say, “Beauty is kind and gentle.

Like a young mother half-shy of her own glory she walks among us.”

And the passionate say, “Nay, beauty is a thing of might and dread.

Like the tempest she shakes the earth beneath us and the sky above us.”

The tired and the weary say, “beauty is of soft whisperings. She speaks in our spirit.

Her voice yields to our silences like a faint light that quivers in fear of the shadow.”

But the restless say, “We have heard her shouting among the mountains,

And with her cries came the sound of hoofs, and the beating of wings and the roaring of lions.”

At night the watchmen of the city say, “Beauty shall rise with the dawn from the east.”

And at noontide the toilers and the wayfarers say, “we have seen her leaning over the earth from the windows of the sunset.”

In winter say the snow-bound, “She shall come with the spring leaping upon the hills.”

And in the summer heat the reapers say, “We have seen her dancing with the autumn leaves, and we saw a drift of snow in her hair.”

All these things have you said of beauty.

Yet in truth you spoke not of her but of needs unsatisfied,

And beauty is not a need but an ecstasy.

It is not a mouth thirsting nor an empty hand stretched forth,

But rather a heart enflamed and a soul enchanted.

It is not the image you would see nor the song you would hear,

But rather an image you see though you close your eyes and a song you hear though you shut your ears.

It is not the sap within the furrowed bark, nor a wing attached to a claw,

But rather a garden for ever in bloom and a flock of angels for ever in flight.

People of Orphalese, beauty is life when life unveils her holy face.

But you are life and you are the veil.

Beauty is eternity gazing at itself in a mirror.

But you are eternity and your are the mirror.

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Only Breath by Rumi

Rumi

Rumi

Not Christian or Jew or Muslim, not Hindu
Buddhist, sufi, or zen. Not any religion

or cultural system. I am not from the East
or the West, not out of the ocean or up

from the ground, not natural or ethereal, not
composed of elements at all. I do not exist,

am not an entity in this world or in the next,
did not descend from Adam and Eve or any

origin story. My place is placeless, a trace
of the traceless. Neither body or soul.

I belong to the beloved, have seen the two
worlds as one and that one call to and know,

first, last, outer, inner, only that
breath breathing human being.

Recommended Book:
Buy The Essential Rumi

See Also:
Rumi Quotes

Moving water by Rumi

Love Letters in the Sand Some Quotes of Kahlil Gibran

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kahlil gibran on friendship

kahlil gibran

Khalil Gibran (January 6, 1883 – April 10, 1931) was a Lebanese-American artist, poet, and writer.Born in the town of Bsharri in the north of modern-day Lebanon.He is chiefly known in the English-speaking world for his 1923 book The Prophet, an early example of inspirational fiction including a series of philosophical essays written in poetic English prose. The book sold well despite a cool critical reception, gaining popularity in the 1930s and again especially in the 1960s counterculture. Gibran is the third best-selling poet of all time, behind Shakespeare and Lao-Tzu.

The Prophet is a book of 26 prose poetry essays written in English by Kahlil Gibran. It was originally published in 1923. It is Gibran’s best known work. The Prophet has been translated into over forty different languages and has never been out of print. In this book a Prophet who is about to board a ship is stopped by a group of people, with whom he discusses topics such as life and the human condition.

This book has a way of speaking to people at different stages in their lives. It has a magical quality, the more you read it the more you come to understand the words and it’s not filled with any kind of dogma and is available to anyone.

Buy The Prophet

Your friend is your needs answered.

He is your field which you sow with love and reap with thanksgiving.

And he is your board and your fireside.

For you come to him with your hunger, and you seek him for peace.

When your friend speaks his mind you fear not the “nay” in your own mind, nor do you withhold the “ay.”

And when he is silent your heart ceases not to listen to his heart;

For without words, in friendship, all thoughts, all desires, all expectations are born and shared, with joy that is unacclaimed.

When you part from your friend, you grieve not;

For that which you love most in him may be clearer in his absence, as the mountain to the climber is clearer from the plain.

And let there be no purpose in friendship save the deepening of the spirit.

For love that seeks aught but the disclosure of its own mystery is not love but a net cast forth: and only the unprofitable is caught.

And let your best be for your friend.

If he must know the ebb of your tide, let him know its flood also.

For what is your friend that you should seek him with hours to kill?

Seek him always with hours to live.

For it is his to fill your need, but not your emptiness.

And in the sweetness of friendship let there be laughter, and sharing of pleasures.

For in the dew of little things the heart finds its morning and is refreshed.

Buy The Prophet

Related Articles you may like :

Love Letters in the Sand Some Quotes of Kahlil Gibran

Kahlil Gibran on love

Kahlil Gibran on pain

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Roll the Dice by Charles Bukowski

Henry Charles Bukowski (August 16, 1920 – March 9, 1994) was a German-born American poet, novelist and short story writer.

if you’re going to try, go all the
way.
otherwise, don’t even start.

if you’re going to try, go all the
way.
this could mean losing girlfriends,
wives, relatives, jobs and
maybe your mind.

go all the way.
it could mean not eating for 3 or 4 days.
it could mean freezing on a
park bench.
it could mean jail,
it could mean derision,
mockery,
isolation.
isolation is the gift,
all the others are a test of your
endurance, of
how much you really want to
do it.
and you’ll do it
despite rejection and the worst odds
and it will be better than
anything else
you can imagine.

if you’re going to try,
go all the way.
there is no other feeling like
that.
you will be alone with the gods
and the nights will flame with
fire.

do it, do it, do it.
do it.

all the way
all the way.

you will ride life straight to
perfect laughter, its
the only good fight
there is.

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