The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost

Robert Frost

Robert Lee Frost (March 26, 1874 – January 29, 1963) was an American poet. His work was initially published in England before it was published in America. He is highly regarded for his realistic depictions of rural life and his command of American colloquial speech.Frost was honored frequently during his lifetime, receiving four Pulitzer Prizes for Poetry. He became one of America’s rare “public literary figures, almost an artistic institution.” He was awarded the Congressional Gold Medal in 1960 for his poetical works.

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;

Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim
Because it was grassy and wanted wear,
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way
I doubted if I should ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I,
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.

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Hope is the thing with feathers by Emily Dickinson

Emily Elizabeth Dickinson (December 10, 1830 – May 15, 1886) was an American poet.Born in Amherst, Massachusetts, to a successful family with strong community ties, she lived a mostly introverted and reclusive life. Many of her poems deal with themes of death and immortality. Emily Dickinson is now considered a powerful and persistent figure in American culture.

“Hope” is the thing with feathers -
That perches in the soul -
And sings the tune without the words -
And never stops – at all -

And sweetest – in the Gale – is heard -
And sore must be the storm -
That could abash the little Bird
That kept so many warm -

I’ve heard it in the chillest land -
And on the strangest Sea -
Yet – never – in Extremity,
It asked a crumb – of me.

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21 Suggestions for Success By H. Jackson Brown, Jr.

H. Jackson Brown, Jr. is an American author best known for his inspirational book, Life’s Little Instruction Book, which was a New York Times bestseller (1991–1994). It’s sequel Life’s Little Instruction Book: Volume 2 also made it to the same best seller list in 1993.

1. Marry the right person. This one decision will determine 90% of your happiness or misery.

2. Work at something you enjoy and that’s worthy of your time and talent.

3. Give people more than they expect and do it cheerfully.

4. Become the most positive and enthusiastic person you know.

5. Be forgiving of yourself and others.

6. Be generous.

7. Have a grateful heart.

8. Persistence, persistence, persistence.

9. Discipline yourself to save money on even the most modest salary.

10. Treat everyone you meet like you want to be treated.

11. Commit yourself to constant improvement.

12. Commit yourself to quality.

13. Understand that happiness is not based on possessions, power or prestige, but on relationships with people you love and respect.

14. Be loyal.

15. Be honest.

16. Be a self-starter.

17. Be decisive even if it means you’ll sometimes be wrong.

18. Stop blaming others. Take responsibility for every area of your life.

19. Be bold and courageous. When you look back on your life, you’ll regret the things you didn’t do more than the ones you did.

20. Take good care of those you love.

21. Don’t do anything that wouldn’t make your Mom proud.

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Heraclitus Quotes

Heraclitus of Ephesus (c. 535 – c. 475 BCE) was a pre-Socratic Greek philosopher, a native of the Greek city Ephesus, Ionia, on the coast of Asia Minor. He was of distinguished parentage. Little is known about his early life and education, but he regarded himself as self-taught and a pioneer of wisdom. From the lonely life he led, and still more from the paradoxical nature of his philosophy and his stress upon the needless unconsciousness of humankind, he was called “The Obscure” and the “Weeping Philosopher”.

Heraclitus is famous for his insistence on ever-present change in the universe, as stated in the famous saying, “No man ever steps in the same river twice” . He believed in the unity of opposites, stating that “the path up and down are one and the same”, all existing entities being characterized by pairs of contrary properties. His cryptic utterance that “all entities come to be in accordance with this Logos” (literally, “word”, “reason”, or “account”) has been the subject of numerous interpretations.

“Good character is not formed in a week or a month. It is created little by little, day by day. Protracted and patient effort is needed to develop good character.”

“Nothing endures but change.”

“Time is a game played beautifully by children.”

“The best people renounce all for one goal, the eternal fame of mortals; but most people stuff themselves like cattle.”

“Those who love wisdom must investigate many things”

“No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it’s not the same river and he’s not the same man.”

“Allow yourself to think only those thoughts that match your principles and can bear the bright light of day. Day by day, your choices, your thoughts, your actions fashion the person you become. Your integrity determines your destiny.”

“To be even minded is the greatest virtue. Wisdom is to speak the truth and act in keeping with its nature.”

“We are most nearly ourselves when we achieve the seriousness of the child at play.”

“Thinking is a sacred disease and sight is deceptive.”

“Much learning does not teach understanding.”

“Man’s character is his fate.”

“Abundance of knowledge does not teach men to be wise.”

“Character is destiny”.

“Opposition brings concord. Out of discord comes the fairest harmony”.

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A Toast to Antryump

Originally posted on My Precious Life:

For those who may be unfamiliar, Antryump is a blogger who painstakingly posts of exemplary writers of bygone days–wonderful writers whose works will never be forgotten. And so I, whose works will be forgotten by most, would like to pay Antryump this tribute.

I toast you Antryump

because you triumph

over everyday mundane

by expressing thoughts

and quotes and words

of men of long-held fame:

Kahlil, Confucius, Socrates,

Emerson and Rumi:

men who from centuries past

still are speaking to me.

Mandella, Tolstoy, even Steve,

men of rare content

are brought to life

because of you

and precious hours spent.

It is with pleasure that I read

your each and every post

and dwell on words

that from the past,

speak to me the most.

So, thank you Antryump,

for being you, and bringing

light to bear on these

great artists, who through you,

make us more aware.

©Patricia Ann Boyes/2014

View original 51 more words

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Persistence quotes

Persistence is the fact of continuing in an opinion or course of action in spite of difficulty or opposition.

“With ordinary talent and extraordinary perseverance, all things are attainable.”

- Thomas Fowell Buxton

“Nothing in the world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent. The slogan Press On! has solved and always will solve the problems of the human race.”

- Calvin Coolidge

“Persistence is to the character of man as carbon is to steel.”

– Napoleon Hill

“The majority of men meet with failure because of their lack of persistence in creating new plans to take the place of those which fail.”

- Napoleon Hill

“You may encounter many defeats, but you must not be defeated. In fact, it may be necessary to encounter the defeats, so you can know who you are, what you can rise from, how you can still come out of it.”

-Maya Angelou

“Permanence, perseverance and persistence in spite of all obstacles, discouragement, and impossibilities: It is this, that in all things distinguishes the strong soul from the weak”

-Thomas Carlyle

“If you can’t fly then run, if you can’t run then walk, if you can’t walk then crawl, but whatever you do you have to keep moving forward.”

- Martin Luther King, Jr.

“If you are going through hell, keep going.”

-Winston Churchill

“An invincible determination can accomplish almost anything and in this lies the great distinction between great men and little men.”

- Thomas Fuller

“Courage doesn’t always roar, sometimes it’s the quiet voice at the end of the day whispering ‘I will try again tomorrow.”

-Mary Anne Radmacher

“A river cuts through rock, not because of its power, but because of its persistence.”

- Jim Watkins

“It does not matter how slowly you go as long as you do not stop.”

- Confucius

“I do not think that there is any other quality so essential to success of any kind as the quality of perseverance. It overcomes almost everything, even nature.”

- John D. Rockefeller

“Knowing trees, I understand the meaning of patience. Knowing grass, I can appreciate persistence.”

- Hal Borland

“The rewards for those who persevere far exceed the pain that must precede the victory.”

- Ted W. Engstrom

“When you come to the end of your rope, tie a knot and hang on.”

- Franklin D. Roosevelt

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FATE by Ralph Waldo Emerson

DEEP in the man sits fast his fate
To mould his fortunes, mean or great:
Unknown to Cromwell as to me
Was Cromwell’s measure or degree;
Unknown to him as to his horse,
If he than his groom be better or worse.
He works, plots, fights, in rude affairs,
With squires, lords, kings, his craft compares,
Till late he learned, through doubt and fear,
Broad England harbored not his peer:
Obeying time, the last to own
The Genius from its cloudy throne.
For the prevision is allied
Unto the thing so signified;
Or say, the foresight that awaits
Is the same Genius that creates.

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